L'ingresso di Palazzo Archinto

The entrance of Palazzo Archinto towards via Olmetto, with the gate built in 1910 and designed by Giuseppe Bagatti Valsecchi

 

For twenty-five years, ASP Golgi-Redaelli has put its energy and resources into protecting, studying and enhancing the value of its diverse cultural heritage, which has been entrusted to the Servizio Archivio e Beni Culturali (Archive and Cultural Heritage Services). Here, collaborators from various disciplines, such as art, architectural and photography historians, archivists and teaching advisors work from time to time alongside the director and deputy director.

In addition to promoting the preservation and awareness of its heritage through restorations, loans to exhibitions and entrustments to museums, ASP Golgi-Redaelli gives scholars permanent access to its heritage in the reading room at its prestigious headquarters, Palazzo Archinto, in Via Olmetto 6, which continues to preserve some of the 18th-century baroque style imparted by Carlo Archinto.

Important to the accessibility and dissemination of this heritage is a series of illustrated books promoted by the Organisation, among which are Il tesoro dei poveri [The Treasure of the Poor] (2001), which covers artistic heritage; Milano. Radici e luoghi della carità [Milan: Roots of Charity] (2008), that gives an account of the history of the Luoghi Pii Elemosinieri, or almoners’ charity houses; the Guida dell’Archivio [The Archive Guide] (2012), and Il paese dell’acqua [The Land of Water] (2013), which looks at the Organisation’s rural assets, such as old farmsteads and related themes concerning the history of agriculture and society.

ASP Golgi-Redaelli also reports its cultural heritage directly and dynamically through activities at schools of all types and levels within its Laboratorio di didattica ‘L’Officina dello storico’, or historian’s workshop teaching lab project, in collaboration with IRIS (Interdisciplinary History Teaching and Research) and the Ufficio Scolastico Regionale (Regional Department for Schools). Under the guidance of archivists and teachers, students come into contact with caregiving and general history by literally ‘seeing and touching first-hand’ old and very particular documents.